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Why using Police to maintain power? RM 6.3 Billion in year 2012

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Budgetary figures of 2010, 2011, and 2012 show that the Najib administration is more interested in using the police to maintain power than to fight crime.

In the context of the heightened crime situation nationally, it is high time for the nation to examine the priorities of the police through its budgetary arrangements.

It is important to note that the police execute the policies of ruling party/coalition. There is no point to blame the police for misplaced priorities. Ultimately, the policy directions of the police reflect the choices made by the government of the day.

The police was given an allocation of RM 4.5 billion in 2010, RM 5.8 billion in 2011 and RM 6.3 billion in 2012 respectively. There is an increase of RM 1.8 billion or 40% between 2010 and 2012.

However, consistently in the past three years, criminal investigation received only 8% of the total allocation.

Where did the rest of the budget go to?

Management and Logistics jointly consumed 59% of allocation in 2010 and 55% in 2011 and 2012;

Internal Security and Public Order category’s share of allocation was 22% in 2010, 25% in 2011 and 27% in 2012. Internal Security and Public Order category increased its allocation from RM975 million in 2010 to RM1.46 billion in 2011 and RM 1.68 billion in 2012.

Between 2010 and 2012, allocations given to this category increased by 72% while the total financial allocation for the police increased by 40% during the period. While Internal Security and Public Order include the traffic police and border patrol, it essentially deals with protecting the government rather than protecting the people.

Intelligence (in particular the Special Branch) received 6% of the allocation. A “spy” agency like the Special Branch is not needed in a democracy.

Elaborating on the roles of “Intelligence”, Budget 2012 says that it is “to safeguard the security of the nation by gathering intelligence through secret and open means on communist, subversive and extremist elements and (shielding the nation) from intelligence and spying of local and foreign threats.”

Two decades after the Hatyai Accord, it is comical to target the communists, even more so in view of Umno’s recent exchange partnership with the Chinese Communist Party.

The budgetary figures on the police during Najib’s premiership speak for itself. The government is more interested to maintain power through the police than to fight crime.

Allocation to the Royal Malaysian Police, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

2010 2011 2012 Increment between 2010 and 2012
RM % RM % RM % %
Management 2,080,549,300 46% 2,247,329,900 39% 2,505,960,200 40% 20.45
Logistics 606,540,100 13% 906,887,200 16% 942,718,400 15% 55.43
Criminal Investigation 354,535,500 8% 471,462,800 8% 504,408,000 8% 42.27
Intelligence 266,391,400 6% 355,798,600 6% 381,108,000 6% 43.06
Drug Prevention 163,350,900 4% 240,571,000 4% 218,731,700 4% 33.90
Internal Security and Public Order 975,114,200 22% 1,456,909,500 25% 1,681,546,800 27% 72.45
Commercial Crime Investigation 62,966,000 1% 111,290,100 2% 82,237,300 1% 30.61
Total 4,509,447,400 100% 5,790,249,100 100% 6,316,710,400 100% 40.08

Sources: Anggaran Peberlanjaan Persekutuan 2010, 2011, 2012

:- Media statement by Liew Chin Tong in George Town on Monday, 16th July 2012 (DAP)